Archive for March, 2014

ARTICLE: Do you have silent inflammation?

ImageDo you have silent inflammation? by Dr. Tim Holcomb, The Victoria Advocate, March 18, 2014

Your degree of wellness and the rate at which you are aging depend upon the level of inflammation that is ongoing in your body.

It can be silently wearing you down, resulting in chronic, degenerative diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, weight gain, arthritis, thyroid problems, fatigue, fibromyalgia and accelerated aging. That’s why I recommend the actual level be measured.

There is no way to tell just by looking at you. Here are the tests that I use to do just that. The most important test is the ratio of arachidonic acid to eicosapentaenoic acid.

This ratio should be in a certain range and can alert you to silent inflammation years to decades before you develop health problems. If this ratio is high, you are at risk of a heart attack, getting cancer, developing Alzheimer’s and more.

Another important test that is seldom measured is fasting insulin. If it is high, you are five times more likely to develop heart disease. In contrast, if you have high cholesterol, you are only twice as likely to develop a heart attack.

If your ratio of fasting triglycerides to your HDL (good) cholesterol is high, you have silent inflammation, so these need to be checked. Still another test is c-reactive protein, a common blood test that is useful but not as good as the ones already mentioned.

Measuring the percent of body fat with calipers at skin folds and waist measurements are additional tools I use as an indirect measure of inflammation and insulin resistance.

For men, ideal body fat measurements are from 12-15 percent body fat. A man’s waist should be less than 40 inches. Women should be anywhere from 20-25 percent body fat, and the waist should be less than 35 inches.

If you are serious about getting healthy again, I recommend you get these tests done as soon as possible. This way, you will know the amount of inflammation you are up against and be able to do something to help yourself in slowing down your aging process and preventing and reversing the symptoms of chronic diseases.

Tim Holcomb is a Victoria nutritionist, pharmacist, naturopath and chiropractor.

http://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/2014/mar/18/gl_tim_holcomb_031914_235251/?features

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ARTICLE: Restless Legs Syndrome May Signify Bigger Health Problems

Image“Restless Legs Syndrome May Signify Bigger Health Problems”
from Medical Xpress / Neurology, March 5, 2014

A nationally-recognized sleep expert has published an editorial describing Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) as a possible biomarker for underlying disease. The editorial appears in the March 5, 2014 issue of Neurology the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology and was authored by Boston Medical Center neurologist Sanford H. Auerbach, MD.

RLS is a disorder of the nervous system. Patients with RLS have uncomfortable sensations in their legs which lead to an overwhelming urge to move them – most often at night or whenever the patient is resting.

The editorial was in response to an analysis of 12,556 men who were followed over time by the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, published in the same issue of Neurology, which showed multiple disease associations with RLS.

“Patients with RLS had a higher mortality rate than similar men, and showed an especially strong tendency toward cardiovascular disease and hypertension,” said Auerbach, associate professor of neurology and psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. In earlier analyses of the same data, men with RLS were more likely to be diagnosed with lung disease, endocrine disease, diseases of nutrition and metabolism and immune system problems.

Auerbach suggests that restless leg syndrome is a meaningful biomarker for serious disease, and that RLS screening may become more common as a tool for primary care providers to identify patients at risk.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-restless-legs-syndrome-signify-bigger.html

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ARTICLE: RLS and Inflammation

ImageARTICLE: YOU WON’T BELIEVE THE CAUSE OF RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME
by Brad Chase, Natural News, March 4, 2014

Do you suffer from restless legs syndrome? Researchers have puzzled over the cause of this curious condition for decades with little explanation for why some people simply can’t keep still at night.

According to past studies, possible causes for RLS include:

• Inability to process dopamine properly
• Genetics
• Other chronic diseases
• Medications
• Pregnancy
• Iron deficiencies

New studies, however, have looked a little more closely at the possible causes for RLS. Since RLS is often associated with other chronic conditions, like chronic fatigue, diabetes, and peripheral neuropathy, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine decided to examine the link between these other conditions and RLS in 2011. What they found out about the possible cause of restless legs syndrome was rather surprising.

The researchers theorized that because some of these other diseases and conditions are related to immune disorders caused by inflammation, that inflammation could also be a trigger for restless leg syndrome. When the researchers dug deeper, they found 38 diseases and conditions highly-related to RLS. Ninety-five percent of these were related to excessive inflammation in the body. Due to this high level of connection, the researchers summarized that inflammation may play a larger role in RLS than was thought previously. The researchers stated that inflammation could play a role in RLS in three ways:

• Inflammation could trigger iron deficiencies that lead to RLS
• Immune responses to imbalanced bacteria levels in the intestines could trigger inflammation that lead to RLS
• Altered genetic host defense mechanisms may lead to excessive inflammation which could trigger RLS

Curing inflammation and RLS
Based on this theory, individuals with RLS can eliminate RLS episodes by controlling inflammation. This can be done in three separate ways.

1. Eliminate inflammation. Eliminating sources of inflammation from food and medications (when possible). Inflammatory foods include:

• Omega-6 fats
• Processed foods
• Refined carbohydrates
• Sugar
• Trans fats

2. Take anti-inflammatory supplements. This step will help calm any existing inflammation as well as reduce the inflammatory effect of newly consumed foods. The best supplements for reducing inflammation and stopping RLS include:

• Calcium and magnesium
• Curcumin
• Valerian
• Iron
• Omega-3s
• B vitamins (12, 9, and 6)
• Ginger
• Vitamin A
• Vitamin E

Image3. Eat anti-inflammatory foods. The last step is to eat anti-inflammatory foods and ensure you have a wide variety of sources of inflammation-fighters in your diet. These foods will help control inflammation and eliminate RLS symptoms, if the theory from the University of Washington researchers is correct. The following foods are well-known inflammation-fighters:

• Cherries
• Peppers
• Walnuts
• Fatty fish
• Berries
• Beets
• Tomatoes
• Leafy greens

Control RLS with anti-inflammatory agents
Although more research about the role of inflammation in RLS is necessary, there is evidence to support that this may be a large contributing factor to RLS symptoms. If the University of Washington researchers are correct, this could open up a whole new way to treat RLS without dangerous sedatives or other medications. You can control your RLS without the use of harsh medications.

If you suffer from restless leg syndrome, give the anti-inflammatory cure a try.

ImageAbout the author:
Brad Chase is the President of ProgressiveHealth.com. His website provides articles and natural remedies to help people solve their health concerns.

This article was originally published on the Natural News website
http://www.naturalnews.com/044154_restless_leg_syndrome_inflammation_healthy_immune_system.html

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