Successful Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome with the Herbal Prescription “Yokukansan.”

ImageYokukansan, also known as TJ-54, is composed of SEVEN herbs; Angelica acutiloba, Atractylodes lancea, Bupleurum falcatum, Poria cocos, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Cnidium officinale and Uncaria rhynchophylla.

Yokukansan is used to treat insomnia and irritability as well as screaming attacks, sleep tremors and hypnic myoclonia, and neurological disorders which include dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Not only has Yokukansan proven in studies to have STRONG anti-inflammatory qualities, but EACH of the seven herbs that make up Yokukansan have anti-inflammatory qualities (references to these studies are below).

In 2010 a study showed that Yokukansan was beneficial in relieving RLS in all 3 test subjects.

In their conclusion, the scientists don’t mention that it was due to the anti-inflammatory properties of Yokukansan that brought on the relief in all 3 subjects.

However, it is just a matter of time before this case becomes another obvious example of the undeniable LINK between inflammation and RLS.

ImageTHE STUDY:
“Successful treatment of restless legs syndrome with the herbal prescription Yokukansan.”

Hideto Shinno, Mami Yamanaka, Ichiro Ishikawa, Sonoko Danjo, Yasushi Inami, Jun Horiguchi and Yu Nakamura. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. Volume 34, Issue 1, 1 February 2010, Pages 252–253.

CONCLUSION:

RLS improved in ALL 3 cases after the addition of Yokukansan. We speculate that actions on GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic systems might account for some of the therapeutic effects of KS in the present cases. YKS, therefre, appears to be useful in RLS treatment.

REFERENCES:

“Use of Yokukansan (TJ-54) in the treatment of neurological disorders: A review.”
S. de Caires, V. Steenkamp. Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria

“Ameliorative effects of yokukansan on behavioral deficits in a gerbil model of global cerebral ischemia.”
Liu Y et al. Brain Res. 2014 Jan 16;1543:300-7. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2013.11.015. Epub 2013 Nov 19.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24269335

“Yokukansan promotes hippocampal neurogenesis associated with the suppression of activated microglia in Gunn rat.”
Motohide Furuya et al. Journal of Neuroinflammation 2013, 10:145 doi:10.1186/1742-2094-10-145
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/10/1/145

“Effects of Angelica acutiloba on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions in vitro and in vivo.”
Kyungjin Lee et al. Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology, August 2012, Vol. 34, No. 4 : Pages 571-577
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/08923973.2011.636048

“Further Phenols and Polyacetylenes from the Rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea and their Anti-Inflammatory Activity.”
M. Resch et al. Planta Med 2001; 67(5): 437-442. DOI: 10.1055/s-2001-15817
https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1055/s-2001-15817

Bupleurum (Bupleurum falcatum)
http://www.herbosophy.com.au/bupleurum-bupleurum-falcatum

Assessment of anti-inflammatory activity of Poria cocos in sodium lauryl sulphate-induced irritant contact dermatitis.
Fuchs SM et al. Skin Res Technol. 2006 Nov;12(4):223-7.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17026651

“Antioxidant and Antiinflammatory Activities of Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza uralensis): Aroma Extract.”
Aki Tanaka and Takayuki Shibamoto. Chapter 20, pp 229–237. Chapter DOI: 10.1021/bk-2008-0993.ch020. ACS Symposium Series, Vol. 993.
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2008-0993.ch020

“Components of rhizome extract of Cnidium officinale Makino and their in vitro biological effects.”
Bae KE et al. Molecules. 2011 Oct 21;16(10):8833-47. doi: 10.3390/molecules16108833.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22019572

“Uncaria rhynchophylla inhibits the production of nitric oxide and interleukin-1ß through blocking nuclear factor ?B, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in macrophages.”
Kim JH et al. J Med Food. 2010 Oct;13(5):1133-40. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2010.1128.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828308

You can read the full study here:
www.deepdyve.com/lp/elsevier/successful-treatment-of-restless-legs-syndrome-with-the-herbal-tIA5ur7GMK

2 Comments »

  1. Nazih Nahlus said

    Edited Reply:
    Dear Team of RLS doctors,

    Yes, it is absolutely related to inflammation.
    This year I have been taking on my own the anti-inflammatory medicine Olfen (50 mg per day)
    regularly for my back cramps (with other supplements like Zinc and Magnesium) and
    my RLS has truly disappeared.
    Now I am taking Olfen 50mg about 3 times per week with Magnesium.

    2) I think RLS is also related to poor circulation resulting from lack of exercise.

    3) Finally, Vitamin B6 (like 50 mg) Greatly triggers my RLS

    Best,

    Nazih Nahlus
    Professor of Mathematics
    American University of Beirut

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