Posts Tagged anti-inflammatories

A Japanese Study Has Found an Association Between RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME and INFLAMMATION

sleepcoverDr. Terumi Higuchi of the Department of Nephrology, Keiai Hospital, Tokyo Japan, headed a recent study to determine if there was an association between RLS, oxidative stress and inflammation in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

The results of the study were published in the August 2015 edition of the “Sleep Medicine Journal” (Volume 16, Issue 8, Pages 941–948).

The study was called “Association of restless legs syndrome with oxidative stress and inflammation in patients undergoing hemodialysis”

In the HIGHLIGHT section of the study, Dr. Higuchi states that “Restless legs syndrome was associated with oxidative stress and inflammation.”

You can read more details about the study here:
http://www.sleep-journal.com/article/S1389-9457%2815%2900746-7/abstract?cc=y=

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A Wayne State Study is Testing the Effects of Tocotrienols (from Palm Oil) on Restless Legs Syndrome

palm-oil-fruitINTRODUCTION:

For many years I’ve waited with great hope that some day there would be a study to test the effectiveness of a natural anti-inflammatory on patients with RLS. Today, I’m extremely excited to announce that dream is coming true!

The article below gives details on a study that is underway that is going to test the effect of powerful anti-inflammatories called “Tocotrienols” on End-Stage Renal Disease (Kidney Disease) and at the same time they are going to measure its effect on Restless Legs Syndrome.

After the article I have posted some details on what Tocotrienols are, and how their anti-inflammatory benefits have tested in regard to other medical conditions.

THE STUDY:

“A team of researchers led by Pramod Khosla, Ph.D., associate professor of nutrition and food science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Wayne State University, will study the effects of a daily supplement of a Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil to see if it improves dyslipidemia, a disorder of lipoprotein metabolism that may be manifested by a decrease in the “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in patients with ESRD who are on hemodialysis. Tocotrienols are a form of Vitamin E and have been shown in recent years to have diverse health effects. In addition, Khosla’s team will explore the impact on symptoms such as inflammation and symptoms related to Restless Leg Syndrome in the same cohort of patients.

Khosla believes that the supplement will also act as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient, leading to improved nutritional status, lipid profiles, and inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in the ESRD patients.

The three-year study, funded by a $2.4 million grant from the Malaysian Palm Oil Board, a premier government agency of Malaysia, will take place in multiple dialysis centers in the United States and Malaysia. The cross-collaboration will allow the investigators to evaluate differences in dietary patterns of 800 dialysis patients in the two countries. With the patient pool in Michigan of predominantly African Americans and Caucasians and the Malaysian cohort comprised of three distinct ethnicities – Malays, Chinese and Indians – the investigators hope to shed light on possible genetic and metabolic differences in the dialysis populations. Additionally, as a significant proportion of dialysis patients suffer from Restless Legs Syndrome — an unpleasant tingling or cramping sensation that impacts the quality of life — the investigators hope to shed some light on the underlying causes for the condition.redpalmoil

“End-stage renal disease patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis experience a higher risk of complications such as cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, Restless Leg Syndrome, insomnia and other health issues,” said Khosla. “In this study, we hope to see significant improvements in various biomarkers that should help decrease some of these complications.”

Dr. James Sondheimer, associate professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at WSU stated “We hope to gain a better understanding of how tocotrienols, as substances with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, affect clinical outcomes as well as metabolic parameters.”

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-07/wsu–wss071315.php

ABOUT TOCOTRIENOLS:

Tocotrienols are members of the vitamin E family. An essential nutrient for the body, vitamin E is made up of four tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma and delta). Tocotrienols are potent gene regulators and modulators of many enzymes involved in human health, helping to quash the inflammation, glycation, and other processes that contribute to age-related diseases. Tocotrienols are increasingly being recognized for their potential roles in protecting against cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, liver disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and even osteoporosis.

Tocotrienols are natural compounds found in select vegetable oils, including rice bran oil and palm oil, wheat germ, barley, saw palmetto, anatto, and certain other types of seeds, nuts, grains, and the oils derived from them. This variant of vitamin E typically only occurs at very low levels in nature.

In studies, Tocotrienols reduced plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), which is both a marker of and a cause in the inflammatory response that damages heart and blood vessels. They reduce other inflammatory mediators such as cytokines.

Tocotrienols are potent antioxidants, which appear to reduce the oxidant-induced inflammation that contributes to bone loss.

553f63ad3015dedf22d0017954155678Tocotrienols given to mice with pancreatic cancer significantly improved their survival. Only 10% of animals in the control group survived for the study period while 70% of those taking tocotrienols survived!1 Pancreatic cancer is a particularly fast-moving and lethal form of cancer, and this study presents a promising new treatment option. Beyond cancer, research is showing that tocotrienols have a place in reducing important risk factors for some of the most lethal chronic diseases. For example, tocotrienols have been found to promote new artery formation after a stroke, lower homocysteine levels, improve insulin sensitivity, protect vital brain circuitry, and even prevent bone loss.

In a study using rabbits, tocotrienol supplementation, after a high-fat diet, significantly lowered a host of markers of both inflammation and heart muscle damage.

Through studies, tocotrienols have been closely linked to neuroprotection through their potent antioxidant properties, as well as their ability to redirect the production of inflammatory molecules to non- or even anti-inflammatory actions.

SOURCES:

“Tocotrienol” Wikipedia  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocotrienol
“The Little-Known Benefits Of Tocotrienols” by Thomas Rosenthal http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2014/8/the-little-known-benefits-of-tocotrienols/page-01
Prasad K. Tocotrienols and cardiovascular health. Curr Pharm Des. 2011;17(21):2147-54.
Das S, Mukherjee S, Lekli I, et al. Tocotrienols confer resistance to ischemia in hypercholesterolemic hearts: insight with genomics. Mol Cell Biochem. 2012 Jan;360(1-2):35-45. Nazrun AS, Norazlina M, Norliza M, Nirwana SI. The anti-inflammatory role of vitamin e in prevention of osteoporosis. Adv Pharmacol Sci. 2012;2012:142702.
Nizar AM, Nazrun AS, Norazlina M, Norliza M, Ima Nirwana S. Low dose of tocotrienols protects osteoblasts against oxidative stress. Clin Ter. 2011;162(6):533-8.
Muhammad N, Luke DA, Shuid AN, Mohamed N, Soelaiman IN. Two different isomers of vitamin e prevent bone loss in postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:161527.
Tiwari V, Kuhad A, Bishnoi M, Chopra K. Chronic treatment with tocotrienol, an isoform of vitamin E, prevents intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative-nitrosative stress in rats. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2009 Aug;93(2):183-9.
Kaileh M , Sen R. Role of NF-kappaB in the anti-inflammatory effects of tocotrienols. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Jun;29(3 Suppl):334S-339S.

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The Link Between Stroke, Restless Legs Syndrome and Inflammation

11111ast-stroke-posterYou may have read about a new study that’s getting a lot of press. The study shows that severe Restless Legs Syndrome is linked to increased stroke.

Here is an excerpt about the study from an article written by Megan Brooks of MedScape.

“More severe restless legs syndrome (RLS) is associated with an increased risk for stroke, particularly ischemic stroke, a new analysis of data from the Nurses’ Health Study II suggests.

“We were surprised at the importance of taking into account RLS severity — it was only severe RLS, not milder RLS, that was associated with increased risk of stroke,” principal investigator Xiang Gao, MD, PhD, director, Nutritional Epidemiology Lab, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University in University Park, said in a statement.”

You can read the full article here:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/846486

This is not actually news. There was a study published in 2008 that demonstrated a powerful link between Stroke and Restless Legs Syndrome.

“A new US study has found that people with restless legs syndrome (RLS) have double the risk of stroke and heart disease compared to people without RLS. The study is the work of Dr John W Winkelman, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues, and is published in the Janaury 1st 2008 issue of the journal Neurology.” from “Restless Legs Linked To Increased Stroke And Heart Disease Risk” by Catharine Paddock, Medical News Today
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/92849.php

As is the case with many other diseases and conditions, logic dictates that inflammation is the common link and points to the fact that RLS is an inflammatory condition and can therefore be treated if an anti-inflammatory protocol is set into motion.

In other words, stop eating crap that messes up your body.strokex216

Here are some quotes about the link between inflammation and stroke (for more information about the link between RLS and inflammation visit http://www.RLcure.com).

“Inflammation is an all encompassing term for a complex process that entails multiple cellular, hormonal and biochemical alterations that are both systemic and organ-specific. A panalopy of acute and chronic infections as well as many exogenous and intrinsic sources of inflammation is associated with an increased risk for ischemic stroke.”  from “Inflammation and Stroke” by Bruce M. Coull, Arizona Health Science Center, University of Arizona, Department of Neurology

“Evidence continues to accumulate to suggest important roles for inflammation and genetic factors in the process of atherosclerosis and specifically in stroke. According to the current paradigm, atherosclerosis is not a bland cholesterol storage disease, as previously thought, but a dynamic, chronic, inflammatory condition due to a response to endothelial injury.”  from “Genetic and Inflammatory Mechanisms in Stroke” by Sally Sultan, MD, Columbia University Medical Center

“Recent work in the area of stroke and brain ischemia has demonstrated the significance of the inflammatory response accompanying necrotic brain injury. Acutely, this response appears to contribute to ischemic pathology, and anti-inflammatory strategies have become popular.”  from the study: “The Inflammatory Response in Stroke” by Qing Wang, MD et al. J Neuroimmunol. 2007 May 14.

“Exactly how inflammation plays a role in heart attack and stroke remains a topic of ongoing research. It appears that the inciting event in many heart attacks and some forms of stroke is buildup of fatty, cholesterol-rich plaque in blood vessels.”
Deepak Bhatt, M.D, Chief of Cardiology for the VA Boston Healthcare System (from “Inflammation and Heart Disease” The American Heart Association)

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“RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME – A SCOURGE, BUT THERE ARE SOLUTIONS” by Ken Cowley. Heart Disease Miracle Blog

BikramQuote1(Editor’s Note: While researching online I found this article plugging my website http://www.rlcure.com and I’d like to share it with you).

As a contributor to this blog I’ve spoken before about my own health, nutrition and fitness thoughts and issues.

One issue I’ve had, and which I might be able to help others with is Restless Legs Syndrome. If you’ve never had it, you won’t understand it, but if you have you’ll know exactly what I mean when I say it’s a scourge. It’s not debilitating, it’s not exactly painful, it doesn’t stop you doing things, but it does/can have a big impact on quality of life.

So, what is it?

Essentially it’s a restless creeping feeling in one’s legs, particularly in the quads/thighs, and particularly at night and particularly (for me anyway) when sitting down. It’s extremely uncomfortable and I find it at it’s worst during flights or long films, or even just sitting down in my living room watching tv.

I’ve done quite a bit of research in to it, including what people usually say are the biggest triggers (caffeine, stress, poor diet, high blood pressure) and what are the solutions (medication, quinine, stretching etc.).

However, I recently came across a website with some excellent suggestions in it about RLS, and I’m happy to give it a plug here. The chap who runs the website isn’t even selling anything, he just wants to pass on his findings. Here’s the link; http://www.rlcure.com

Basically, he says that RLS is completely caused by Inflammation. Now, inflammation is a whole other subject, with a whole other list of causes and symptoms.

However, his cure, which simply involves a combination of herbs which can be purchased at any health store, DOES seem to helping me a lot, so I suggest you have a think about if, if you suffer from RLS.

Two other things that have also helped are;

Bikram Yoga, and again, that’s a whole other subject, which I’ll come back to some day.
65f064ee487967f293f01ed3d9500b3c
ProArgi9 from Synergy Worldwide. The reason I think Pro Argi helps with RLS is that it creates Nitric Oxide in the body and therefore has a big impact on circulation, blood flow (and possibly inflammation) thereby helping the legs to relax, including when seated or lying down at night time.

So, that’s my tuppence worth on Restless Legs Syndrome, a nasty little affliction, and I hope the above may be of some help to fellow sufferers!

Ken Cowley has a background in the leisure industry and sales, and wants to further explore all aspects of health, fitness and wellness and share this with friends and colleagues along the way. http://www.heartdiseasemiracle.com

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“Is Vitamin D Deficiency to Blame for Your Restless Legs?” by Dr. Robert Rosenberg, The Sleep Disorders Centers of Prescott Valley and Flagstaff

vitamindEditor’s Note: Please understand that although I publish any  hopeful information I can when it comes to natural remedies for RLS, I still stand firm in the belief that INFLAMMATION is the cause of RLS. So, a Vitamin D deficiency may be the cause (or may contribute) for some people, while others it may be a Vitamin B12 deficiency, for other an Iron deficiency, for others a Magnesium deficiency … and in most cases, just bad eating habits and stress.

They have yet to identify inflammation as being the real problem, and the ways that the inflammation is created, as being secondary. I don’t mean secondary as being ” less important,” what I mean is that you first have to identify the problem, admit that it exists, before the REAL healing can start. Once you have identified the problem, that your RLS is a symptom of the chronic inflammation in your body, then you can try and figure out how it got there, and how you can get rid of it.

As the saying goes “identifying the problem is HALF of the solution.”

However, instead of articles and studies that identify the real problem, what continually appears in the press are articles like the one below that attempts to identify the “ONE THING” that will set your legs free. They look for something we can BLAME it all on.

I totally agree with what Dr. Sircus stated in my previous post “no single medicine or nutritional agent has the power to both treat and prevent chronic inflammatory conditions.”

In other words, yes, a Vitamin D deficiency is inflammatory, and should be avoided at all costs. However, taking Vitamin D is not going to “cure” you if you are still leading an inflammatory lifestyle (including stress) or are consuming inflammatory foods.

Here is the article by Dr. Rosenburg:vitamindmonth2

“Within the past few years there have been several studies linking vitamin D to various sleep disorders. This connection is not surprising since vitamin D is involved in the regulation of calcium, phosphorous, and bone growth, as well as muscle function, immune regulation, and brain function.

There have also been studies linking vitamin D deficiency to sleepiness and enlarged tonsils in children, resulting in pediatric sleep apnea. Among the newer studies released, one of the most interesting studies is a new study, published August 2014 in the journal Sleep Breath titled The Effect of Vitamin D Supplements on the Severity of Restless Legs Syndrome, which links vitamin D deficiency to restless legs syndrome (RLS).

The study followed 12 subjects, all of whom were diagnosed with both primary RLS (meaning there was no other obvious cause) and vitamin D deficiency. All 12 patients were treated with vitamin D. After their levels returned to normal, they were reassessed. The severity of their RLS also significantly improved after treatment, causing the study authors to conclude that vitamin D deficiency may be associated with RLS.

This news comes on the heels of several other studies that have shown low levels of vitamin D in people with RLS.

vitd1There are many places in which you can find vitamin D. One source is our skin, which can produce vitamin D upon exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D can also be found in certain foods including:

Milk
Cheese
Eggs
Oily fish (salmon, cod, and mackerel)

Low levels of vitamin D can be caused by dark skin pigmentation, limited sunlight exposure, pregnancy, abnormal intestinal absorption, and some medications.

As a result of these studies — and several other studies correlating vitamin D to restless legs syndrome, sleep apnea, excessive sleepiness, and nighttime muscle cramps – I intend to start checking my patient’s vitamin D levels more often. I am only sorry that I was not aware of this relationship before. Just a decade ago, most of us in sleep medicine would never have imagined that the same vitamin deficiency that can cause rickets and osteoporosis could be
involved in sleep disorders. Modern medicine never fails to amaze or humble me.”

7aa229a83d4c9bbb98f4434bf37fce83Dr. Robert Rosenberg first started practicing medicine in Chicago as an associate professor at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine where he taught students, interns, and residents and attended to patients. In 1982, he moved to Arizona and opened a private practice focusing on internal medicine, pulmonary medicine and sleep medicine. He continued to teach in Arizona and California. In recent years, he’s limited his practice to sleep medicine, and he’s also started writing, blogging, and lecturing on sleep. His expertise as a sleep physician has been featured in various publications, including Newsweek and Oprah Magazine, and he also serves as a forensic sleep medical consultant for legal cases. Dr. Rosenberg sees patients at his private practices, the Sleep Disorders Centers of Prescott Valley and Flagstaff, both in northern Arizona. His first book is titled “Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day,”  

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“Inflammation and Management of RLS with Magnesium” by Dr. Mark Sircus

5efcd76e69382b4b36cbca2afc8528e8“There are many factors that trigger inflammation. They are found in both our internal and external environments and include excessive levels of the hormone insulin (insulin resistance), emotional stress, environmental toxins (heavy metals), free-radical damage, viral, bacterial, fungal other pathogenic infections, obesity, overconsumption of hydrogenated oils, periodontal disease, radiation exposure, smoking, spirochetes such as the Borrelia that causes Lyme disease, and certain pharmacological drugs.

Approximately 12 million Americans have Restless Legs Syndrome, a sleep and movement disorder characterized by unpleasant (tingling, crawling, creeping and/or pulling) feelings in the legs, which cause an urge to move in order to relieve the symptoms. Magnesium supplements may be helpful for relieving Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) and for treating insomnia.

However, in the final analysis there is no single medicine or nutritional agent that has the power to both treat and prevent chronic inflammatory conditions. 012_symbol

Magnesium acts as a general cell tonic while it reduces inflammation and systemic stress. Equally it is important in overall energy (ATP) production, hormonal and enzyme production and function which all reflect powerfully on the process of inflammation.”

The above is an excerpt from an article by Dr. Mark Sircus Ac., OMD, DM. Dr. Sircus is a prolific writer and author of several medical and health-related books. Dr. Sircus’s methods are based on medical science and long years of clinical experience, not only his own but experiences of doctors from around the world.

http://drsircus.com/medicine/magnesium/inflammation-and-systemic-stress

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Nature Will Heal Your Restless Legs …. be Patient!

doctor-handing-omega-3-fish-oil-prescription-720x340Unlike drugs, nutrients do not have rapid effects. There’s NO QUICK fix!

The business of nutrition is to BUILD a better body. That has to wait on Nature to turn over body cells. A blood cell lasts 60 to 120 days. In 3 to 4 months your whole blood supply is completely replaced. In 6 months almost all the proteins in your bones die and are replaced … even the DNA OF YOUR GENES. In a year all your bones and even the enamel of your teeth is replaced.

This time curve is well illustrated by the course of deficiency diseases. If I remove the Vitamin C from your diet, within 4 weeks your blood Vitamin C will drop to zero. But, you will see no symptoms of disease at 4 weeks. You have to WAIT until enough of the HEALTHY cells have been REPLACED by unhealthy cells. It is ANOTHER 12 weeks before the symptoms of scurvy start to ravage your body.Be-rational_c

Think of it this way, If you take a neglected house plant and start feeding and watering it, the leaves may PERK UP a BIT from the improved nutrition. But you have to wait for the OLD leaves to die off and NEW leaves to grow before you get a really HEALTHY plant. It is the SAME with the human body. When you start feeding it better, you have to wait on your body to grow NEW improved cells.

To understand the difference between drugs and herbs, let’s focus on how they work. Pharmaceutical drugs are highly purified, potently concentrated chemicals which act by blocking processes of the body. This often gets rid of the symptoms but may create undesired side effects. Anti-congestants will clear your nose, but cause drowsiness. Prolonged use of non-steroids temporarily ease your arthritis pain, but may adversely affect your liver.

14519312_sWhen we drink a tea or take a tincture of an herb, we are taking in the whole plant, with thousands of compounds. Although plants contain unique ingredients which give them specific effects, it is the COMBINATION of all these compounds that accounts for a plant’s effectiveness and safety. The concept that a plant is more than the sum total of all its parts is known as synergy. Synergy means compounds work TOGETHER to boost the power of plants and offset actions of unsafe constituents.

In their wholeness, plants work by effecting favorable changes in our physiology, allowing the body to return to a balanced state. In the holistic tradition, the body knows how to heal itself and will do so given proper assistance. Herbs are our allies in this process.101

In order to get results from herbal treatments it is often necessary to be on a course for several months, especially for serious and/or long-standing problems. Herbs work slowly restoring the body back to balance. There is no magic quick fix with natural medicine because it has to work at such deep levels within the body systems.

medication-and-restless-legs
SOURCES:
Alternative Medicine for Pets – Nerve damage by Silva Mirovics All Experts en.allexperts.com
How long does it take to heal? by Dr. M. Colgan http://www.diseaseeducation.com
The Whole Herb: Natural Drugs to Help the Body Heal Itself by Mary Jo Ruggieri http://www.columbuspolarity.com

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