Posts Tagged aspartame

“STRENGTHENING CIRCULATION TO LESSEN RESTLESS LEGS SYMPTOMS” by Dr. Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc

arterial-and-venous-circulation-of-the-legsThere are a number of simple ways to boost circulation. Simply standing up and walking more frequently can work wonders.

You can also stretch, touch your toes, and practice deep breathing. Strengthening your circulation is especially important for people in office jobs, as sitting for many hours is known to be bad for your health on a number of levels, specifically cardiovascular.

I particularly recommend an ancient and extensively researched Tibetan herbal formula ( find out more here: http://www.dreliaz.org/recommended-product/tibetan-herbal-formula ) which has been shown in clinical studies to support circulation and cardiovascular health, along with other benefits. The formula includes Iceland moss, costus root, cherubic myrobalan, and other more unusual botanicals. In addition to boosting circulation, the formula also supports cellular health and immunity and provides antioxidant protection, demonstrated in more than 40 years of published studies.

We’re still learning about RLS, so I would encourage people to keep an eye on emerging research. However, by combining moderate exercise and minor lifestyle changes, together with circulation-boosting formulas and essential minerals, people struggling from RLS may find significant relief.

Even better, by supporting circulation and cardiovascular health, they can help lower their risk for heart disease and other serious conditions.

DrEliaz_BioPic-150x150Dr. Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc, integrates Western medicine with his extensive knowledge of traditional Chinese, Tibetan, ayurvedic, homeopathic, and complementary medical systems. With more than 25 years of clinical experience and research, Dr. Eliaz has a unique holistic approach to the relationship between health and disease, immune enhancement, detoxification, and cancer prevention and treatment. For more health and wellness information, visit http://www.dreliaz.org.

This article originally appeared on the website “Maria’s Farm Country Kitchen” http://www.mariasfarmcountrykitchen.com/restless-legs-syndrome

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“SURPRISING HERB MAY HELP RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME” by Michelle Schoffro Cook, Care2.com

St.-Johns-Wort-For-Restless-Leg-Syndrome1When you think of the herb St. John’s Wort you probably think of depression. But new research published in the medical journal Clinics found that you might also want to consider this herb to help with Restless Leg Syndrome.

Officially known as Willis Ekbom’s disease, Restless Leg Syndrome is a common condition affecting the nervous system and characterized by jumpy legs that can’t remain still at night. It’s not a dangerous condition but it can be uncomfortable for sufferers and can interfere with quality of sleep and life.

The study is called “Saint John’s wort, an herbal inducer of the cytochrome P4503A4 isoform, may alleviate symptoms of Willis-Ekbom’s disease” by José Carlos Pereira et al.

The study found that St. John’s Wort effectively boosted certain liver enzymes that tend to drop to low levels in individuals suffering from restless legs. Researchers believe that the herb’s effectiveness in the pilot study may be attributed to the significant enzyme boost, resulting in a calming effect on restless legs.

That is potentially good news for sufferers of the condition who are often placed on a drug known as pramipexole, which has many side-effects, including: fainting, dizziness, suddenly falling asleep, unexpected gambling or sexual urges, tiredness, abnormal dreams, muscle pain, difficulty walking, skin growths, weight gain, difficulty breathing or swallowing, and an increased risk of the skin cancer melanoma. Ironically, the drug can also cause unusual twitching or muscle movements, which are what sufferers of Restless Leg Syndrome are trying to alleviate when they seek medical intervention.Peelbark_St._Johns-wort_(Hypericum_fasciculatum)_(6439017119)

While the study was a small pilot study, the herb showed impressive results, improving the symptoms of 17 of the 21 participants. The study results are also invaluable considering the superior safety record of St. John’s Wort in comparison to pramipexole. Some of the potential side-effects of St. John’s Wort include: photosensitivity when taken within a few hours of direct sunlight exposure, anxiety, headaches, muscle cramps, sweating, weakness, dry mouth, or skin irritation; however, many of these symptoms tend to be infrequent.

Conversely, St. John’s Wort is commonly recommended as a treatment for: anxiety, mild to moderate depression, cancer, nerve pain, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The dosage used in the study to treat restless legs syndrome was 300 mg daily of St. John’s Wort extract for three months. For other health conditions, dosages vary greatly. For more information about dosages for other health conditions, consult my article “St. John’s Wort is for Much More than Depression.”

Because many drugs can interact with this herb it is important to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or natural health provider before taking.  Avoid taking if pregnant or nursing.

You can read the results of the study here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3634959

wwwL._UX250_Michelle Schoffro Cook, MSc, DNM, ROHP, PhD is an International Best-selling & Sixteen-time Book Author, Doctor of Traditional Natural Medicine. She lives in British Columbia.

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Dr. Stanley Lang, MD has a 90% Success Rate Treating RLS Patients over a 30 Year Period

Over 30 years ago Dr. Stanley Lang, MD developed a program to treat RLS and has been helping his patients to heal their RLS ever since (starting way back before the condition had an actual name).

His success rate is around 90% for those patients that have followed his regime.

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“Restless Legs Syndrome May be a Sign of a Bigger Health Problem” by Dr. Michael Jurgelewicz, DC, Bucks County Center for Functional Medicine

MikeJurgelewitz-059h-239x300A nationally-recognized sleep expert has published an article explaining Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) as a possible biomarker for underlying disease.

The editorial was in the March 5, 2014 issue of Neurology the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology and was authored by Boston Medical Center neurologist Sanford H. Auerbach, MD.

Restless Leg Syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It is characterized by throbbing or other uncomfortable sensations in the legs with an uncontrollable urge to move them. Symptoms typically occur at night when a person is relaxing or getting ready for bed and can increase in severity during the night. Most people with RLS have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, which can lead to fatigue. Many people with RLS report that their job, personal relations, and activities of daily living are strongly affected as a result of their sleep deprivation. They often have difficulty concentrating and brain fog.

The editorial was in response to an analysis of 12,556 men who were followed over time by the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, published in the same issue of Neurology, which showed multiple disease associations with RLS.

The team found patients with RLS had a higher mortality rate than similar men, and showed an especially strong tendency toward cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In addition, men with RLS were more likely to be diagnosed with lung disease, endocrine disease, as well as diseases of nutrition and metabolism and immune system problems.

Researchers suggest that restless leg syndrome is a meaningful biomarker for serious disease, and that RLS screening may become more common as a tool for primary care providers to identify patients at risk.

I have had personal success with patients simply by adding magnesium and calcium at bedtime. They both calm muscles and nerves. Calming botanicals such as valerian, passion flower, lemon balm, and skullcap can also be added to support sleep and relaxation. You can also assess RBC nutrients such as magnesium, calcium, and potassium through many functional laboratories. In addition to assessing nutrient status they do play a significant role with blood pressure regulation and overall cardiovascular health. This provides a better indicator of nutrient status, compared to the serum.

I would also recommend an organic acid test. An organic acid test can identify imbalances occurring in the body that 202333-legs-bigprecede abnormal findings on a CBC or an MP. Organic acids are products of metabolism that can sensitively identify nutrient deficiencies that lead to metabolic roadblocks. Organic acids go a step further then measuring nutrient concentrations by measuring whether the nutrient is functionally adequately. Abnormal concentrations of organic acids in the urine can provide a functional marker for metabolic effects of nutrient deficiences, genetic polymorphisms, impaired enzyme function, toxic exposure, neuroendocrine activity, and intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Organic acid testing can indicate the functional need for specific nutrients, diet modification, antioxidant protection, detoxification, and other therapies.

There is also some evidence that indicates low iron levels in the brain being associated with RLS. A CBC w/diff and an Iron Panel (Serum Iron, Ferritin, % Saturation, TIBC, UIBC) can identify an iron deficiency.

Restless leg syndrome may only be just a small part of the picture. It may be a simple nutrient deficiency in many cases, however, it is important to look deeper into the patient’s health. This includes thoroughly reviewing the patient’s history looking deeper into the cardiovascular system and other inflammatory markers. Looking deeper into the above factors can provide an effective treatment plan for patients with restless leg syndrome.

Dr. Michael Jurgelewicz, DC, DACBN, DCBCN, has been studying wellness for the past 10 years. He has a B.S. degree in Health & Wellness, a B.S. degree in Anatomy, and is a Doctor of Chiropractic. He is Board Certified in Nutrition by the American Clinical Board of Nutrition, a Diplomate of the Chiropractic Board of Clinical Nutrition, has completed Functional Medicine University with a Certificate in Functional Medicine and has studied under both world renowned thyroid expert, Dr. Datis Kharrazian and Chiropractic Neurologist, Dr. Frederick Carrick. He is also active in continuing education through the Clinical Nutrition Certification Board. http://www.thefunctionalmedicinecenter.com

sleep-auerbach-hREFERENCES

S. Auerbach, A. S. Walters. Restless legs syndrome: A predictor of lower physical function. Neurology, 2014; DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000298

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“HOW TO RELIEVE RESTLESS LEGS WITH NUTRITION” by Cynthia Crozier, The Spencer Institute

relieve-restless-legsWHAT IS RESTLESS LEGS?

Restless Legs is best described as an uncontrollable, strong urge to move your legs. You feel the need to move your legs, mostly when you are trying to relax, causing difficulties in sleep. Restless Legs, also known as Restless Legs Syndrome, or RLS, could give you unpleasant sensations in your legs, that occur mostly at bedtime. These sensations usually only feel better when you move your legs. You feel very uncomfortable and feel worse unless you move your legs. When the disorder is severe, you also may have the urge to move your arms, but that only happens in rare cases.

Many different symptoms have been described by people suffering from RLS, such as:

leg pain
cramps
tingling
itching
burning
aching

These symptoms will start or get worse when you’re inactive, or in the evening. The urge to move increases when you’re sitting still or lying down and resting. Restless leg syndrome usually begins slowly. Over time, the legs become more affected.

NUTRITION PRESCRIPTION: RELIEVE RESTLESS LEGS

We know that RLS has a lot to do with Inflammation. When you have less inflammation, you have less restless legs. The process to remove what is causing your inflammation is a job. And a big one at that.

Because this means that you will have to change your eating habits. Changing your eating habits by avoiding foods that cause the inflammation will set you on the right path of relief from RLS.

And adding more anti-inflammatory foods to your diet will set you on the road to recovery. Moving in this healthy direction will have more benefits for you than just relief from RLS.

As you begin removing the bad foods that are causing inflammation and adding in the good foods that will fight inflammation, you will be gaining relief from other things that may be weighing heavy on your mind. Weight, for one thing, is something that can be reduced as well when you begin to implement these changes to your diet. Some of the same healthy foods that will help with your RLS symptoms will also assist in getting you and keeping you at your goal weight.

The foods that are causing inflammation in your body are high in sugar and saturated fat.

You can figure these out on your own by looking at nutrition labels and by also using common sense. But here are the worst culprits that do the most damage:

Corn is at the top of the ‘bad’ list. Corn is in everything, and is causing lots of problems in our systems. GMO corn, is linked with inflammation in the stomach. You should read the nutrition labels and try to avoid foods with high fructose corn syrup or corn oil.

Gluten is another one on the ‘bad’ list. Gluten is found in most grains and is highly inflammatory. Bagels and other starches 1940s-gluten-image1contain gluten and are famous for triggering inflammation in the body. If you try to avoid foods that contain gluten and choose healthy grains or seeds like buckwheat, quinoa or millet instead, you will feel much better.

Trans fats and hydrogenated oils found in margarine, shortening and baked products that contain these fats like cookies, pies, buns, etc. are huge culprits of causing high inflammation in your body.

Look for the healthy alternatives because even small amounts of trans fats are dangerous and should be avoided.

Sugary foods are bad news for inflammation as well. Consuming foods like candy, or drinking soft drinks and even sweetened yogurt will elevate your blood glucose levels. When this happens, it activates the body’s response to cause inflammation. If you eat sugary foods, stick to 13 grams or less per serving.

Deep Fried foods like french fries, onion rings, chips, hamburgers, etc. are harder to digest than baked or even pan-fried foods. Consumption not only causes inflammation but also dramatically increases exposure to free radicals, which damage our body sort of like rust damages a car.

Iodized salt or any sodium is important to our body’s function, but too much can be harmful. It has been known to trigger high blood pressure, liver, kidney and heart disease. Especially in people who are overweight.

Deli meat is on the ‘bad’ food list for causing inflammation. Any meat that contains preservatives, that have been found to cause cancer are very bad for you. Bacon and sausage are the biggest culprits.

Omega 6 fatty acids that are found in cooking oils like canola, corn and soybean oil is something you should never have in your kitchen. Also, these oils are extremely fragile, that if exposed to heat, air or light they go rancid. Almost all store-bought corn, canola and soybean oil that have been sitting on the shelf for a long period of time has gone rancid. Rancid oils in the body causes free radicals which cause inflammation and could cause cancer. Replace these oils with the healthier alternatives like olive oil or coconut oil.

aspartime1Un-natural sweeteners like nutrasweet, splenda, saccharin, aspartame, aminosweet, etc. have been linked to many serious health conditions and should be avoided all the time.

Dairy products like yogurt, ice cream, cottage cheese, butter, cheese, etc. are very inflammatory foods because they contain lots of hormones, antibiotics, and other harmful ingredients.

Wheat products are a highly acid-forming and inflammatory item for the body. Also, most wheat now available is genetically-modified (GM). Many serious health concerns are starting to be linked to the consumption of GM wheat.

Alcohol is high in sugar and a burden on the liver. Alcohol is another inflammatory food item that should be used in moderation or avoided altogether.

Now that you know what to avoid that will cause inflammation in your body, here is the list of foods that fight inflammation in the body.

Fatty fish. Oily fish, like salmon, mackerel, tuna and sardines are high in omega 3 fatty acids, which have been shown to help reduce inflammation in the body. To get the most benefits, you will need to eat fish several times a week and it should be cooked in healthy ways, by avoiding fried, dried or salted. Fish oil supplements are a healthy alternative if you don’t enjoy eating fish.

Whole grains as opposed to white bread, cereal, rice and pasta, can help keep harmful inflammation away. Whole grains have more fiber, which has been shown to reduce levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation in the blood, and they usually have less added sugar.

Dark leafy green veggies contain one of the best sources of vitamin E, which has been known to play a key role in protecting the body from inflammation. The veggies that contain the higher concentrations of vitamins and minerals are spinach, kale, broccoli and collard greens.

P_healthyEating1NUTRITION AND RESTLESS LEGS

Nuts are another source of inflammation-fighting healthy fats. Almonds, which are also rich in fiber, calcium and vitamin E are at the top of the list. Then comes walnuts, which contain high amounts of alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fat. All nuts are packed with antioxidants, which can help our bodies fight off and repair the damage caused by inflammation.

Soy contains isoflavones, estrogen-like compounds, that may help lower CRP and inflammation levels in women. Avoid heaviliy-processed soy and instead go with more soy milk, tofu, and edamame (boiled soybeans) for your diet.

Low-fat dairy milk products as well as yogurt, which can also contain pro-biotics, have been known to reduce inflammation in the stomach. Foods with vitamin D and calcium, like skim milk and yogurt are good for all with their anti-inflammatory properties.

They are also important to keep up bone strength and possibly reduce cancer and other risks.

Peppers contain high quantities of antioxidant vitamins and lower levels of starch.

Hot peppers like chili and cayenne are rich in capsaicin, a chemical that is used in topical creams that reduce pain and inflammation. This may not be true for people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, though. You should stick with what works for you.

Tomatoes may also help reduce inflammation in some people. Juicy red tomatoes, specifically, are rich in lycopene, which has been shown to reduce inflammation in the lungs and throughout the body. Cooked tomatoes contain even more lycopene than raw ones, so tomato sauce works too.

Beets have a brilliant red color which has been shown to reduce inflammation, as well as protect against cancer and heart disease, thanks to their fiber, vitamin C and plant pigments called betalains.

1243286.largeGinger and turmeric spices, common in Asian and Indian cooking, have been shown in various studies to have anti-inflammatory properties.

Turmeric, the ingredient that gives curry its yellow color, works in the body by helping to turn off the trigger that processes inflammation. Ginger has been shown to reduce inflammation in the intestines when taken in supplement form. Garlic and onions both contain anti-inflammatory chemicals.

Olive oil, along with anything fitting into a heart-healthy diet is good for inflammation. The compound oleocanthal, which gives olive oil its taste, has been shown to have a similar effect as NSAID painkillers in the body.

Berries are low in fat and calories and high in antioxidants. Berries have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, possibly due to their anthocyanins, which gives them their rich color.

Tart cherries have the highest anti-inflammatory content of any food. Experts recommend eating 1.5 cups of tart cherries, or drinking 1 cup of tart cherry juice a day to see similar benefit, they have to be tart.

Drinking plenty of water is one of the most effective natural remedies for inflammation. Water reduces inflammation and promotes cartilage health. To reduce internal inflammation, drink water to carry away waste products. Your body releases histamine in order to stop water loss. If you give your body adequate amounts of water, less histamine will be released. Avoid caffeinated drinks as much as possible, day or night.

Considering dietary supplements? You should first check with a doctor or nutritionist to find out if you are low on iron, vitamin B, folic acid, or magnesium first because deficiencies can bring on RLS symptoms. There are many supplements, vitamins & minerals and herbs to you to help fight inflammation.

Calcium + Magnesium (CalMag), Carrot Juice, Curcumin, Grape seed extract, iron, L-Theanine, Omega 3, Valerian Tea, Vitamin C. All of the above listed have anti-inflammatory properties. Some even also act as a natural antihistamine, or lowers glutamate levels.

While limiting or eliminating some foods and adding others, may just do the trick to stop RLS, there are a few other lifestyle changes that may contribute to the quickness of your relief from RLS.

You should also try to get to bed at the same time every night, while allowing plenty of time to wind down first, no eating 2 hours before bed, and take a really warm shower or bath to relax about an hour before sleep. As a bedtime routine, try relaxation and stretching techniques as well.
1111photo
I hope this information is helpful to you.

Cynthia Crozier is a graduate of the Spencer Institute with a Certification as a Wellness Coach. She provides people with the assistance, motivation, guidance, inspiration & knowledge they need to gain proficiency in making healthy lifestyle changes, and to achieve the ability to create new wholesome habits on your own to live a happier, healthier more fulfilling life. http://www.thejoys.us

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Quote from Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, MD, Medical Director of the Tahoma Clinic, Tukwila, WA

drwright-e1284061802183“Drug therapy focuses on alleviating the nervous system imbalance to calm restless legs. However, taking these drugs is like using a SLEDGEHAMMER to crack a nut. They are quite powerful and dangerous and should be reserved for only the most severe cases.

Natural medicines and therapies, on the other hand, can be very effective, safe and without side effects.  

Many of my patients have proven that certain herbs provide AMAZING treatment for RLS. You don’t need to wait another day to start getting fast and permanent relief from RLS misery.”

– Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, MD, Medical Director of the Tahoma Clinic, Tukwila, WA

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“Sleep Disruptions Can Be Caused by Stress and Adrenal Function” by Dr. James L. Wilson

adrenal-fatigue-225x300Stress and adrenal function affect sleep, particularly the circadian pattern of cortisol secretion by the adrenal glands. Circulating cortisol normally rises and falls throughout the 24 hour daily cycle, and is typically highest at around 8 AM and lowest between midnight and 4 AM. Both high and low nighttime cortisol levels can interrupt sound sleep. Stress normally causes a surge in adrenal hormones like adrenaline and cortisol that increase alertness, making it more difficult to relax into sound sleep–especially when they remain high or rise and fall irregularly through the night. Frequent or constant stress can chronically elevate these hormone levels, resulting in a hyper-vigilant state incompatible with restful sleep.

If this is the reason for poor sleep, anything that reduces stress and enhances the ability to handle stress may improve sleep. This can include relaxation, breathing and/or meditation techniques, certain yoga postures, healthy lifestyle changes, and stress-relieving life alterations. Refraining from vigorous exercise in the evening and taking time to consciously relax before going to bed may calm the adrenals and help lower cortisol and adrenaline levels.

When the adrenals fatigue, adrenal hormone levels may become low, leading to another possible source of nighttime sleep disruption–low blood sugar. Cortisol plays an important role in maintaining blood sugar (glucose) levels around the clock. Although blood glucose is normally low by the early morning hours, during adrenal fatigue cortisol levels may not stay sufficient to adequately sustain blood glucose. Low glucose signals an internal alarm (glucose is the main fuel for all cells, including brain cells) that disrupts sleep so the person can wake up and refuel.

Low nighttime blood glucose can also result from inadequate glycogen reserves in the liver. Cortisol causes these reserves to be broken down into glucose that is then available to the cells. When low cortisol and low glycogen reserves coincide, blood glucose will most likely drop, disrupting sleep. Waking between 1 AM and 3 AM may indicate low blood sugar resulting from inadequate glycogen reserves in the liver, low adrenal function and cortisol, or both. This is often the culprit when panic or anxiety attacks, nightmares, or fitful, restless sleep occur between 1 and 4 AM.

If low blood sugar is disrupting sound sleep, supporting healthy adrenal function and dealing with the adrenal fatigue may adrenal-fruit1contribute long term to sound sleep. Also having a healthy snack before bed can help fortify the body’s nighttime energy reserves. The snack should be one or two bites of food that contains protein, unrefined carbohydrate, and high quality fat, such as half a slice of whole grain toast with peanut butter or a slice of cheese on a whole grain cracker. Eating or drinking sugary, refined foods will only aggravate the problem. Sometimes exercising before bed can help, since exercise tends to raise cortisol levels. (more on blood sugar and adrenal function)

Lack of sleep can be a significant body burden that, in itself, can contribute to adrenal fatigue. Every time the wake/sleep cycle is altered, it takes several days to weeks for the body and cortisol levels to adjust. In fact, sleep ranks with diet and regular exercise as an essential component of a healthy life. People on alternating shifts with less than three weeks between shift changes are continually hammering their adrenal glands and may become very susceptible to adrenal fatigue.

Chronic lack of sleep is now regarded as a health hazard and has been associated with several possible health consequences. These include lowered immunity with increased susceptibility to infections, impaired glucose tolerance, low morning cortisol levels, and increased carbohydrate cravings. Lack of sleep can also elevate circulating estrogen levels, upset hormonal balance, and slow healing and prolong the recovery period. These are in addition to the decreased alertness and concentration that most people experience when missing an inordinate amount of sleep.

what-stresses-your-bodyThe consensus from research and clinical observation is that it is necessary to sleep an average of eight hours per day. Some people need even more in the beginning phases of recovery from adrenal fatigue. A saliva cortisol test done at night and compared with daytime levels and with the test standards for those times will help determine if either high or low cortisol may be interfering with sound sleep. If cortisol is a likely culprit, cortisol levels will be significantly higher or lower than normal for those times.

With a researcher’s grasp of science and a clinician’s understanding of its human impact, Dr. Wilson has helped many DrJamesLWilson_navy_web100physicians understand the physiology behind and treatment of various health conditions. He is acknowledged as an expert on alternative medicine, especially in the area of stress and adrenal function. Dr. Wilson is a respected and sought after lecturer and consultant in the medical and alternative healthcare communities in the United States and abroad. His popular book Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome has been received enthusiastically by physicians and the public alike, and has sold over 400,000 copies. Dr. Wilson resides in sunny Tucson, Arizona.

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